History & Social Sciences

World Geography (9th)

World Geography is a foundational social science course where students garner critical insights they will use in future courses. This course examines a broad range of geographical perspectives focusing on major regions of the world. Each region will be reviewed in a similar structure to maintain continuity during the course and provide students with the opportunity to bridge themes across borders. Specifically, the course will explore where regions are located, climate, and significant geographical features. Students will also gain an unbiased understanding of other nations and cultures in our global environment to synthesize and construct a meaningful “larger” picture in our ever-shrinking world.

World History (10th):

World History is designed to provide students with an  understanding of  the major developments of human history from early civilizations to the contemporary world. Students will be introduced to the role of geography, economics, politics, religion and the arts in human history.  The four primary skills students will be asked to develop  are: practicing inquiry, identifying and interpreting information, analyzing data, and evaluating and clearly presenting information. The course is divided into the following thematic units:  1. Technological and Environmental Transformations 2. Organization and Reorganization of Societies 3. Regional and Transregional Interactions 4. Global Interactions 5. Industrialization and Globalization 6. Accelerating Changes, 1900 – present

US History (11th):

This course is focused on the American experience after the Civil War and Reconstruction.  Thus, we are focused on industrialization and the transformation of politics, the economy, and the broader culture in this period of dramatic change.  With our small class format, we strive to engage students in active discussion and participation on a daily basis.  We endeavor to go beyond the mere facts of history and dive more comprehensively into the causes and effects of the major eras of U.S. History with an eye to their effect on modern society.  The development of college level analytical writing skills is also a focus and considered a priority in our work throughout the year.

AP US History (11th):

This is a rigorous, intro college level equivalent course designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the major periods of U.S. history while concurrently preparing students for the College Board administered AP U.S. History exam in May of each year.  We begin with the pre-Columbian Americas and travel all the way through 9/11 and the major touch points of the 21st Century.  Along the way, “APUSH” students work intensively with both primary and secondary source reading and other source material and engage in extensive short and long form analytical writing.  We move at a rapid pace, covering extensive content while also applying the skills of a true academic historian.  These skills include an understanding of historical causation, periodization, and the reasons for societal continuity and change.  Tools of this nature enable us to go beyond facts and dates and understand the major political, economic, and social drivers of change in American history in a deeper and more sophisticated way.

US Government & Politics (12th):

This course lasts for one semester and is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles upon which the United States was founded, and on the structure, function and powers of the various branches and levels of government. The course explores both political theory and practice, and requires students to gain an understanding of the major institutions, groups, ideas and theories that contribute to political life in the contemporary U.S. Students analyze such core concepts as federalism, separation of powers, checks and balances, civil liberties, civil rights and popular sovereignty and gain an understanding of divergent perspectives on and understandings of these concepts. Students also analyze the role of individuals, interest groups, political parties and the media in the United States.

AP Government and Politics (12th):

This is a rigorous one semester course designed to provide you with an understanding of the principles upon which the United States was founded, and on the structure, function and powers of the branches and functions of the federal government. The course explores both political theory and practice, and enables you to gain an understanding of the major institutions, groups, ideas and theories that contribute to political life in the contemporary U.S.

You will be analyzing such core concepts as federalism, separation of powers, checks and balances, civil liberties, civil rights and popular sovereignty and gain an understanding of divergent perspectives on and understandings of these concepts. You will also analyze the role of individuals, interest groups, political parties and the media in the United States.  We also seek to engage with current political events on a weekly basis including major elections as well as actions of the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court.  
In the Spring of each year, the class will engage in a comprehensive review of the class materials in preparation for the College Board administered AP Government and Politics exam administered in May of each year.  

Economics (12th):

This course lasts for one semester and is designed as an introduction to macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts, principles and models. The class meets four times a week for periods of varying length. Students will need to begin reading the text selections before the start of each unit; lectures, class examples, and classwork are designed to clarify and expand upon information from the text. The course is divided between lecture, class discussion and in-class assignments. Students are expected to pay attention to major economic events in the news to facilitate group discussions and enhance comprehension of course readings.